Photo story: Life in the circle

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Photo story: Life in the circle

The CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year competition is open to enter again. Look at last year’s photos.

This photography competition, the Environmental Photographer of the Year, started in 2007. CIWEM (Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management) started it so photographers can show photos of environmental and social issues to many people around the world. Through these photos, we can understand more about climate change and social inequality: why they are happening, and what we can do about them.

This photography competition is growing quickly. In 2014, there were more than 10,000 photo entries. The judges chose the most modern, creative and original. And they showed them at the Royal Geographical Society, London.

Paul Horton from CIWEM says: ‘William Albert Allard said “You’ve got to push and look for pictures nobody else could take. You’ve got to go deeper.” I think this is what the Environmental Photographer of the Year is. Someone has to take the photos that no one else will take, so that we see the reality of our world, look deeper and ask the challenging questions we must ask.’ The exhibition is for professional photographers and amateurs, old and young.

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Winner of the Atkins City Scape Award 2014. Faisal Azim, Life in the circle, 2013. Thanks to Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year

A government report say there are now more than 900,000 beggars in Bangladesh. But the Bangladeshi government says everyone has the right to life and freedom of movement. There are stories of physical, mental and sexual abuse in shelter centres.

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Toufic Beyhum, Supermarket, Himba, 2012. Thanks to Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year

Swakopmund, on the coast of Namibia, is silent most of the year. The people who live there are retired Germans, young natives and the Himba tribes people who come from the north, in traditional clothes. There are beautiful sand dunes along the coast, bright paint on the houses and the Himba tribeswomen walking topless in German supermarkets.

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Roni Bintang, Ashes walk, 2013. Thanks to Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year

School students walk in fields of ash from a volcano (Sinabung Mountain). They are going home to Kuta Rakyat village. Mount Sinabung, on Sumatra Island in Indonesia, has been erupting since September 2013. The area is covered the area with ash. Thousands of people had to leave the area; at least 17 people died.

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Prasanta Biswas, Rainwater collection, 2012. Thanks to Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year

There is not enough drinking water for the rural people of Sundarban, West Bengal, India. It is now hotter and it rains more. The water is more salty and there is more extreme weather - floods, cyclones and droughts.

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Antonio Busiello, Camp of shame, 2013. Thanks to Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year

Campania, Italy, is one of the most polluted areas in the western world. Now it is a home for a large group of Roma. This is the most densely populated region of Italy. More than 5.8 million people live in the 5,247 square mile area.

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Tuyet Trinh Do, Fishing net making in Mekong Delta, Vietnam, 2012. Thanks to Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year

A group of women make a fishing net in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, before the rivers flood every year. They need the flooding because more fish and shrimp come. In 2012, it flooded less, and there were 40 per cent less fish than the year before.

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Angelo Antonio Duarte, Fish death, 2013. Thanks to Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year

The Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon, in Rio de Janeiro. It was an environmental disaster because of the pollution of drains and rivers around it.

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Md Shahnewaz Khan, Smash from the Grave, 2013. Thanks to Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year

Bangladesh makes about four million new houses every year because it has so many people. It has more than 6,000 legal brick fields and many illegal ones. Most workers come from the countryside and work for six to seven months a year in a brick field. A worker earns about $800 per season.

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Kevin Mcelvaney, Adam Latif, 21, 2013. Thanks to Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year

Agbogbloshie in Accra, Ghana. Illegal electronic waste comes here. Boys and girls, between the age of seven and 25, smash stones against old computer monitors, collect metal and burn cables to get copper. Agbogbloshie is one of the largest e-waste dumpsites in the world.

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Taylor Weidman, Indigenous Munduruku Men Fight Construction of the Belo Monte Megadam 2, 2013. Thanks to Atkins CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year

An argument between an indigenous Munduruku man and member of the Federal Police at an occupation of the Belo Monte Dam near Altamira, Brazil. This dam is the first of many dams they are planning in the Amazon area. The Munduruku people have come from the Tapajós River to protest against the dams. The Belo Monte will change the ecosystem of more than 1,500 square km around the Xingu River.

You can enter this year’s competition now. More information: www.epoty.org. You can see the winners at the Royal Geographical Society, London, 22nd June– 3rd July 2015.

NOW READ THE ORIGINAL: http://newint.org/features/web-exclusive/2015/03/09/life-circle/ (This article has been simplified so the words, text structure and quotes may have been changed).